Tag: advice

Plot or Plod: either way you market, it’s work

Let’s consider two words: Plot and Plod. Notice that I didn’t include their near-partner, Ploy, a word which has slimy connotation. To market effectively, it’s best to have a Plan. We all know the Goal – to sell books – but how we get there will differ.… ...

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Fee or Free – do some of each to market

Fee or free depends as much on your time, your tolerance for uncertain outcomes, etc. as it does your budget.

While some authors swear by giveaway, other disdain the ploy. Sure, it’ll bump your Amazon ranking initially but over the long haul does it work?… ...

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Lucky #7 Marketing Tip

‘Lucky’ is an anti-compliment I’ve come to despise: people constantly avenge their perceived lack of good fortune by deriding mine with the banal, “You just lucky.” While my pastor coached me to smile and respond, “Yes, I am blessed,” people continued to hurl it like a curse.… ...

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Fix Your Sales with Marketing Tip #6

OK, you caught me. I like alliteration and rhymes, so I had to use the word ‘fix’ to go with ‘six.’

PJ ColandoBut I’m not being genuine in the title because I. Can’t. Fix. Your. Marketing and Sales. That’s your task. I’ve been sharing, twice weekly in the merry month of May, my marketing experience, not my expertise. ...

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DO and DON’T Marketing Sense #2

Here’s another sandwich for you to digest, another dose a la PJ, the poster child for what not to do when writing-and-marketing a book. I’ve tried to trim the fat, the calories that make you fat-and-sassy, but not necessarily savvy. Broke and not better for it, weeping before the end of the month when nothing’s in your wallet or your Amazon sales chart.… ...

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DO and DO NOT: Marketing Sense

Sense. Scents. Dollars and Cents.

Here are my two cents on Marketing Books. What’s worked for me = DO. What hasn’t worked and/or doesn’t appeal = DON’T. That is, methods of marketing that I think stink.

Presented via the sandwich method I used to pair praise with reprimand and/or imperative throughout a blazingly successful career in speech-language pathology.… ...

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Kill Your Darlings

“Kill your darlings” is literary gospel, a ubiquitous phrase that commands action upon one’s prose. Cut, kill, slash, rewrite. Trim the superfluous flab.

Popularized in novel and screenwriting guides in the ’90s, it’s been ascribed to William Faulkner, Oscar Wilde, Eudora Welty (now there’s a name worthy of a book character), G.K.… ...

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Competent Ones

We are the competent ones. We are the ones who carry on, who become stoic instead of hysterical, the ones who shoulder a weight like it is nothing, nothing at all. We are the ones who make it right for everyone, who don’t say no if you need help, but almost always say no to ourselves.… ...

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Houseguests #3: GPS

We’ve had a host of house guests in Casa Colando, California: most interesting, some sublime, some ridiculous, some petty, a nervy test to the nerves. Reader beware, lest the latter people come to inhabit your house.

A couple called, saying that they were flying to Las Vegas, touring Hoover Dam, and the Grand Canyon, and that they thought they’d saunter over to California to visit with us.… ...

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